Music Theory

Use Chords You Know to Create 9th Chords

Use Chords You Know to Create 9th Chords An easy way to add a 9th to a chord, is by playing the chord in the scale that is up 3 letters from that chord, as a 7th chord. I know this sounds complicated when explained like this, but the examples will clear it all up.
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Drop 2 Voicings On Guitar

Drop 2 Voicings On Guitar This is a continuation of last week’s blog about drop voicings. What Are Drop Voicings? Here’s all the chord fingerings of all the drop 2 voicings in the key of C Move the Cmaj7 fingerings up 5 frets for Fmaj7 chords. Move the Am7 fingerings up 5 frets for Dm7
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Drop Voicings

Drop Voicings Last week we covered closed voicings The Theory of Closed 7th Chord Voicings Drop voicings are “open voicings”, also called “spread voicings” (depending on which music theory book you are reading) The difference between closed and open voicings: Closed voicings: you stack 3rd intervals, the distance between the lowest and the highest note
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Fun Musician Drills, Cool Guitars and Some Humor

Fun Musician Drills, Cool Guitars and Some Humor Cool Improvisation Trick This is something I strongly encourage you to try out. Solo over one of your favorite songs or over a backing track, with an in position (7-note or pentatonic) scale, consistently leaving one string out. For example: solo with the root position A minor
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Sounds Hard But Is Easy: F# Melodic Minor

Things That Sound Hard but Are Very Easy Sometimes, certain things sound very hard, but are surprisingly easy to pull off. An example of this is soloing in the key of F# Most any musician would think of this as “advanced” or “really challenging”. The thought is: “Wooaww, the key of F# has 6 sharps,
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